Global Road Technology (GRT) provides versatile soil binder solutions suitable on a plethora of soil types. The use of GRT products allows even the poorest soil types to be utilised in various engineering applications.

Soil binding is a process involving the application of a soil stabilizer (commonly cement, lime, and/or a combination of other agents) to exposed soil surfaces with the aim to prevent fugitive dust, wind/water induced erosion or ground instability.
A research and development program, EuroSoilStab, administered by a consortium of companies from England, Finland, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands and Sweden identified that the efficacy of soil binders could be categorized into the following four groups:

  • Very good binder in many cases
  • Good in many cases
  • Good in some cases
  • Not suitable

In an attempt to categorize various soil binder mixes, such mixes were used to treat different types of Nordic soils with the relative strength increase recorded in unconfined compression after 28 days of curing.
The research identified that cement possessed good binding characteristics in many cases, particularly in silty soils with organic content of 0-2% and also in peats with 50-100% organic content. On the other hand, the same cement mix yielded only satisfactory binding results (good in some cases) with clays and other organic soils with 2-30% organic content. The efficacy of cement mixes were seen to improve with the addition of other compounds, particularly with the addition of furnace slag.
In instances where lime was tested, satisfactory results were yielded for silt and clay soil types. However in many cases involving peat (organic content between 50-100%), lime and similar mixes failed to suitably bind the samples.
Global Road Technology (GRT) provides versatile soil binder solutions suitable on a plethora of soil types. The use of GRT products allows even the poorest soil types to be utilised in various engineering applications. As an illustration, natural soils categorized as hard soils usually do not yield a UCS of more than 0.4 MPa. However, with a 0.5% by mass addition of GRT stabilizer, a UCS of 2-5.8MPa can be achieved. GRT7000 has proved to be an effective stabilizer in a wide variety of soil types, effective in both highly coarse to highly plastic soils.
Testing of Type 2 gravel treated with a 1% concentration of GRT7000 showed a UCS result of 8.9 MPa after 5 days curing. By comparison, to achieve similar UCS results in cement stabilised Type 2 gravels, a 5-8% cement concentration to material would be required.
When it comes to fine-grained highly plastic soils, GRT7000 is needed in much lower concentrations than lime and cement. Soils with a plasticity index higher than 20 (for which lime considered a very efficient stabilizer), generally require a treatment of either 3-5% of lime or 3-7% of cement. By comparison, only 1% concentration of GRT7000 would be required to stabilize the same material.
Lime or cement treated soils often face cracking under pressure. This problem is exacerbated under wet and cold conditions when water enters existing cracks and freezes. The semi-flexible polymeric characteristics of GRT products overcome these problems, as treated soils are able to withstand high loads.
Once of the most popular lime based soil binders used today is quicklime. Quicklime comes in the form of a power and is highly reactive when mixed with water. For this reason, handling of quicklime is challenging. Conversely, GRT binding agents are user friendly and do not generate dust during application.

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